Liberia Counties

Montserrado County

Montserrado County

Vision: Our vision is to create an economically vibrant county that harnesses the special advantages offered by its diverse urban, peri-urban and rural human and natural resources to ensure equal socioeconomic opportunities for all citizens.  With this vision in our minds, we focus on the three priority areas of roads,   education and health, while attending to the nation’s wider objectives in the  Poverty Reduction Strategy. In this way we move the County forward for the betterment of all its citizens and the development of Liberia as a whole.

Overview: Montserrado County is the seat of the Liberian Government. The county’s capital, Monrovia, was created in 1839, before Liberia’s declaration of independence. The county is the most densely populated. It accounts about 70% of the total population and covers 737 square kilometers, about 2% of Liberia’s total geographic area. The county, however, is the location of 70% of public as well private business organizations and their operations. Government ministries and agencies of government operate in the Monrovian areas. Today, the County administrators are working to restore the vital infrastructures that were broken or destroyed in the Civil conflict, reduce poverty, secure lives and properties, revitalize the economy, provide citizens social services, and preserve and protect the rule of law. Bensonville, the birthplace of the late William R. Tolbert, Jr. is an industrial city; it produces milled rice, sawn wood, soap, plastics, paints, furniture and fixtures, cement blocks, oils, processed fish, and confections.

County Government

County Abbreviation: MO
Created: 1839
Capital: Bensonville
County Flag: The flag contains green, brown, blue, and red. Half is red and half is blue, split along a diagonal line running from the lower left-hand corner to the upper right-hand corner. Blue comprises the top half and symbolizes that Montserrado was the first county. The colors are red, blue and green. The blue color of the flag represents Montserrado as the first County at the time of independence. The red color represents the tribal wars between the settlers and the indigenous. The circle in the center represents the richness of the soil (agriculture).
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent: Nyenekon Beauty
Snoh-Barcon
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 1,118,241
Districts: Montserrado County has 21 townships, 7 cities, 1 borough, 2 chiefdoms, 2 statutory districts.

Race/Ethnicity: The County is highly diverse with members of all of
Liberia’s 16 tribes living together. Bassa- and Kpelle-speaking peoples are in the majority, making up 21% and 52% of the County’s population respectively.

Sex:
Age:

 

 

Economy

GDP:
Unemployment:
Employment: The majority is engaged in business, mostly medium, small, and micro in nature, and mostly informal. Others commute to white collar jobs with Government ministries and agencies, international and national organizations
headquartered in Monrovia. Townships and cities in the rural parts of Greater Monrovia have less accessibility to social services compared to those residing in the Capital. These townships particularly suffer from deplorable roads and insufficient water and sanitation facilities.

County Budget:
Tourist Attraction: Montserrado County is an oasis of attraction, national museums, fine dining, beautiful beaches and entertaining nightlife. The county is also the location of the historic Providence Island or Liberia’s Ellis Island, where immigrants and free American-American slaves disembarked in 1822. A visit to Monrovia provides tourists the opportunity to see an African newspaper published in the 1830s, or stall through a gallery of black presidents dating back to 1847, the National Museum of Liberia, monuments of the country’s presidents including its founder, the first president of the Republic, Joseph Jenkins Roberts, and Liberia’s Centennial Pavilion built in 1947 to commemorate the hundred anniversary of Liberia’s independence, to name a few historical sites.

Education

UNICEF estimates that 1,229 of Liberia’s total of 3,082 schools are situated in Montserrado County. Most of these are however found in the capital or in Greater Monrovia. The Ministry of Education School Census of 2006 shows a total number of
1,096 schools, with 757 in Greater Monrovia, 252 in St. Paul River, 52 in Todee and 35 in Careysburg. Whatever the figure, the fact remains that many children are forced
to walk for several hours to reach their schools and receive a sub-standard education in often dilapidated buildings. Another problem is getting qualified teachers to the remote areas.

Geography

Land Area:
Location: Montserrado borders the Atlantic Ocean in the South, Bong County in the North, and Bomi and Margibi Counties in the West and East.

Health

Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

Grand Bassa County

Grand Bassa County

Vision: We envisage a transformed, secured and prosperous County excellently governed with equal opportunities for all.

Overview: Grand Bassa County is one of the three original counties, along with Montserrado and Sinoe, that first formed the Republic of Liberia. It was established in 1833 and its capital is Buchanan City, named for Thomas Buchanan, an American who served as the first Governor of the Commonwealth of Liberia.
Before the war, the County enjoyed a vibrant economy. International companies such as the Liberian American Mining Company (LAMCO)/Liberia Mining Company (LIMINCO), the rubber plantation of the Liberian Agricultural Company (LAC), the palm oil plantation Liberia Incorporated (LIBINC), the logging concerns Oriental Timber Company (OTC) and National Milling Company all had operations in the County, and the harbor of Buchanan, Liberia’s second largest port, was very active. The majority of citizens are engaged in informal work in agriculture and/or petty trading. For now the main sources of formal employment in the County are the Government of Liberia and several non-governmental organizations, and the LAC rubber plantation provides jobs for a small number. It is expected that ArcelorMittal Steel, the Port of Buchanan, Buchanan Renewable Energy (BRE), and LIBINC will offer many more direct and indirect job opportunities in the coming years.

Margibi County is endowed with diamonds, water, timber, and iron ore, among other important natural resources. These resources are not currently a major part of the economy because they are extracted only on a small scale, especially in the case of pit sawing and diamond activities. There are no logging, mining, or diamond companies operating in the County as yet. Diamonds are also being mined on a very small scale as a result of the restrictions on the mining of solid minerals.” Forestry and timber processing are not a major part of the economy of Margibi County, as the only extraction ongoing is small scale illicit pit-sawing. The citizens have called for a commitment from Firestone to invest $10 million in a rubber wood facility to produce sawn timber, kiln dried lumber and veneers, with an expected start date for the main plant of mid-2008. 500 persons would be expected to be employed, initially increasing to 1,000.

County Government

County Abbreviation: GB
Created: 1839
Capital: Buchanan
County Flag: The County’s flag is a royal blue cloth with the Liberian flag inserted in the upper left corner and two red and two white stripes in the lower right. The dark blue stands for loyalty, while the stripes represent the four Grand Bassa delegates who signed Liberia’s Declaration of
Independence on 26 July 1847, namely Anthony Gardner, John Day, Ephraim Titler, and Amos Herring,

Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 221,693
Districts:
Race/Ethnicity: Bassa-speaking people are in the majority, making up 94% of the County’s population. Other ethnic groups in the County include the Kpelle (5%), and the Kissi (1%), and small numbers of other groups. The Kru, often originating from neighboring Sinoe County, and Fanti fishermen and traders are also a part of the population.

Gender: Gender continues to play a decisive role in determining access to resources and services. Women and girls continue to have limited access
to education, health services and judicial services, which has severely curtailed their participation in the formal economy. Women and girls have been missing out on
opportunities and participation in management and decision-making on all levels of the society. This trend has contributed to feminization of poverty in the County, and in Liberia as a whole.

Almost 35 percent of the population has never attended school, including
nearly 44 percent of females. Illiteracy rates among children and young people remain high at 68 percent (male 55 percent and female 81 percent). The County is strongly committed to gender equity as a means to maintain peace, reduce poverty, enhance justice and promote development. Despite the progress since the end of the war, gender continues to play a decisive role in determining access to resources and services. Women and girls continue to have limited access to education, health services and judicial services, which has severely curtailed their participation in the
economy. Women and girls
have been missing out on opportunities and participation in
management and decision-making on
all levels of the society. This trend
has contributed to feminization of poverty in the County, and in Liberia as a whole.

Health

Besides the Firestone medical facilities, which receive approximately 9,000 patients visits a month and at times buttresses other facilities by helping to provide storage and some medical equipment, there are two main functional Government hospitals
serving the County: C.H Rennie hospital, a referral site in Kakata; and Mike M. Baydoun Health Center in Marshall City. Both facilities badly need ambulances, renovation and supplies for full operation. Apart from the two hospitals, the Government owns 19 clinics among the 36 functioning health facilities in the County. The most prominent among them may be the Dolo Town Community Clinic that was built by the US Embassy. All the Government medical employees are on the government payroll and treatment is provided free of charge with drugs provided by Government and INGOs. Firestone Liberia actively participates to vaccination campaigns for the eradication of childhood diseases.

Economy

GDP:
Resources: Grand Bassa
County is endowed with ample exploitable natural resources including gold, timber, diamonds, crude oil, uranium, sand and rock. Investments in these sectors will yield
significant dividends to the people, helping to reduce the high level of youth unemployment. Timber and gold are explored but on a small scale, while crude oil and uranium are
unexplored. There are no mining and logging companies active in County at present. Palm oil and food crops production are the most important livelihood activities in the County. Currently the palm oil is mostly produced by former employees and squatters of the concession area of Liberian Incorporated (LIBINC), also known as Palm Bay plantation. The production of rubber provided income for some 4% of households.

Unemployment: 5% of marketers in the County are engaged in business
in Monrovia and 14% are selling in urban centers. In the city of Buchanan the major economic activity is fishing, but it is only carried out on a small scale. There is a great potential for fishing industry in Buchanan, so far
unexploited due in part to the lack of refrigeration facilities.

County Budget:
Tourist Attraction: Grand Bassa, like Grand Cape Mount County, does have some beautiful scenery along the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, suggesting real potential for tourism. The coast
at Buchanan has potential for the hospitality and food services industries, considering the number of expatriates that are expected to arrive with the companies. However some important coastal areas are seriously affected by sea erosion, which may
intensify if left unattended.

Education

Elementary: The County educational system was once fairly functional. Today, there is a shortage of educational facilities. The available schools often face a problem of overcrowdedness.
Availability of trained and qualified teachers is also a serious problem.
Due to poor incentives, many teachers left the classrooms in search of greener pastures. Currently there are 257 functioning educational facilities in the County, but as it was confirmed by the CDA consultations, many are operated by volunteers in makeshift facilities such as churches and private accommodations, and do not have
desks or chairs. Margibi County is well known for its concentration of outstanding educational institutions. The most prominent among them is the Booker Washington Institute (BWI), which awards diplomas and is known for its vocational/technical training courses. The County also boasts the Harbel Multilateral High school, where the University of Liberia is operating up to 2nd year of studies; the extension of the Gbarnga-based Cuttington University College; the Kakata Rural Teacher Training
Institute, in charge of training and reactivation of teachers; and the Konola Academy, a co-educational institution and prestigious upper secondary school; among others.

High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography

Land Area:
Location: The County is located in the area from latitude 6°45′ to latitude 5°30′ North, and from longitude 10°30′ to longitude 9°00′ West (ISO 3166-2 geocode: LR-GB). On the Southwest of the County there is the Atlantic Ocean. Grand Bassa borders with four counties: Margibi on the Northwest, Bong on the North, Nimba on the East, and River Cess on the Southeast. The total land area the County is approximately 3,382 square miles (8,759 square kilometers).

Sinoe County

Sinoe County

Vision: Sinoe will be a national leader in development and innovation; a County where citizens enjoy food security and have access to basic social services and modern infrastructure, where good governance and the rule of law prevail.  Core Values:  The County will endeavor to build on our core competencies and values to  support; Accessibility to equal opportunities for all citizens and residents of Sinoe County; That peace, security and the rule of law be restored and preserved;  Governance based upon transparency and effectiveness;  Sustained economic growth, the creation of jobs; and  Preserving the natural resources and also protecting the environment.

Overview: Sinoe is the third original County in the Republic and one of the signatories to its Declaration of Independence on July 26, 1847. After having been inhabited by various African peoples over the millenia, Sinoe was discovered by the Portuguese in the 15th Century as part of what they called the Grain Coast. Prior to the Declaration of Independence, the County was established by the Mississippi Colonization Society in 1822 and later became part of the Republic in 1838. There existed several agricultural industries such as the Sinoe Rubber Plantation (SRP) located in Wedjah District – the second largest rubber plantation in the country next to Firestone; the Butaw Oil Palm Company (BOPC) in Butaw District; two coconut Plantations producing coconut oil – located in Kpanyan and Sanquin Districts respectively. The county is also known for producing red palm oil, plantains, eddoes, cassavas, bananas, sweet potatoes and other crops. Vegetables such collard greens, potatoes greens, cabbage, pepper, corn, bitter balls, and eggplants

County Government

County Abbreviation: SI
Created: 1843
Capital:Greenville
County Flag: The flag of Sinoe has a green cross across a white background or field with the Liberian flag at the upper left corner. The green cross represents the evergreen vegetation, the white field indicates purity and the Liberian flag shows that Sinoe is an integral part of the Republic of Liberia.
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 102,391
Districts: In Sinoe County, the sixteen District Development Consultation Meetings took place in Bodae, Bokon, Butaw, Dugbe River, Geetroh, Karbor/ Tarsue/Sanquin #2, Toto Dwo/
Sanquin #3, Jaedae, Jedepo, Juarzon, Kpanyan, Kulu/Shaw/Boe, Plahn/Nyarn, Pyne Town, Seekon and Wedjah.
Race/Ethnicity: The Kpelle tribe forms the majority ethnic group, with Belle and Gola making the next two largest groups. Kpelle and Gola are the main dialects spoken in the County.
Gender: The County is strongly committed to gender equity as a means to maintain peace, reduce poverty, enhance justice and promote development. Despite the progress since the end of the war, gender continues to play a decisive role in determining access to resources and services. Women and girls continue to have limited access
to education, health services and judicial services, which has severely curtailed their participation in the formal economy. Women and girls have been missing out on opportunities and participation in management and decision-making on all levels of the society. This trend has contributed to feminization of poverty in the County, and in Liberia as a whole.

Age:

Health

Presently, the F.J. Grante Hospital is only meagerly functional, lacking adequate drug supplies, equipment and trained doctors, while the five static clinics previously operated by
Merlin remain unreliably open, but totally without medical supplies or staff salaries. There are also two private clinics: the Catholic clinic and ENI clinic are expected to be open soon. See the chart below for breakdown.
The health sector is in dire need of human resources. Sinoe is one of the counties with the lowest presence of Ministry of Health assigned workers. Quite recently the Ministry of Health appointed a medical doctor for the County, and is also sending a foreign doctor to assist. The County administration has provided housing
accommodation. It is unclear when they will take up their posts.

Economy

GDP:
Resources: Sinoe‘s rich forests, large oil palm and rubber plantations, gold and diamond deposits, long coastline and seaport and fertile soil make the County a potentially prime location for investment and job creation. There existed several agricultural industries such as the Sinoe Rubber Plantation (SRP) located in Wedjah District – the second largest rubber plantation in the country next to Firestone; the Butaw Oil Palm Company (BOPC) in Butaw District; two coconut Plantations producing coconut oil – located in Kpanyan and Sanquin Districts respectively. The BOPC produced on the minimum level about 350 drums of oil daily and comprised a workforce of 2,800.
These industries provided jobs for County inhabitants as well as those migrating in search of better life.
Unemployment: Sixtynine percent of farmers cultivated only upland. The percentage differences between upland and swampland 10% more upland. About 6% of farmers cultivated only swampland.
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction: Sinoe has great potential to become the engine of
economic growth for the country. It is rich in natural resources including gold, diamond and timber. It has a long coastline with white sandy
beaches, lush green vegetation and several waterfalls. Sinoe is also host to the Sapo National Park, the country’s first nature reserve. The 180,000 hectare Sapo National Park which falls largely in Sinoe is the nation’s first
nature conservation reserve. The Park provides essential ecosystem services such as pollination, storage
of excess carbon dioxide which is a
greenhouse gas that causes global
warming, prevention of soil erosion,
protection of the watershed and refuge f o r endangered wildlife species. More than 1000 species of
flowering plants have been found in Liberia. Also, there are about 140 species of trees, 125 species of mammal, 550 species of birds, over 1000 species of insects and 74 known species of reptiles and amphibians, many of which can only be found at Sapo National Park. Among the
mammals found in the Park are the western chimpanzee, forest elephant, pygmy hippopotamus, Colobus and Diana monkeys and the Jentinks and Zebra duikers. Potential for tourism in Liberia is perhaps greatest in Sapo National Park, and even today in the absence of any tourist infrastructure, the park manages to attract a trickle
of eco-tourists every year. Investments in this area will have substantial economic benefits to local people.

Education

Elementary: Recent statistics from the office of the County Education Officer puts the number of public schools at 175, with an enrollment population 17,715 categorized as follows: 149 primary schools with 14,118 students, and 26 secondary schools with 3,597
students. The total number of teachers and support staff in the Sinoe school system is 597 (Source: County education Officer, June 2007). Most schools do not have adequate numbers of teachers to meet student enrolment needs.

Geography

Land Area: Sinoe covers a land area of about 3,861 Square miles (10,000 square kilometers) and has a total coastline of 86 km.
Location: Sinoe is found in the South-eastern region of the Republic of Liberia, which is on the West Coast of Africa. Sinoe is bordered by Grand Gedeh County on the North, by River Cess County on the West, by Grand Kru and River Gee Counties on the East, and by the Atlantic Ocean on the South.

Health

Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

Maryland County

Maryland County

 

Vision: Maryland County shall be a secured, peaceful, socially, economically and infrastructurally viable County with a system of good governance, justice and equal opportunities for all. Core Values:
The County will endeavor to build on our core competencies and values
to support: Equal Access to Opportunities for all. Restoration of Peace, Security and the Rule of Law. Transparent and Effective Governance. Sustainable Economic Growth and Job Creation. Preservation of Natural Resources and Environmental Protection.
Overview: Maryland County is one of the first four counties of the Republic of Liberia. Initially the county was not part of the Republic of Liberia during its founding. The County was established by a resolution of the Legislature of the Republic of Liberia in 1857. The resolution admitted the State of Maryland in Liberia as a County to the Republic with all privileges, immunities and rights accorded the three original counties. The Maryland State Colonization Society as a home land founded the territory on 12 February 1834 for free American Slaves. The territory was first established as the Colony of Maryland. It was incorporated into the “Republic of Liberia in 1857. Harper City is the political capital of the County and is also known as “Cape Palmas”.
Maryland County is endowed with rich soil, minerals, ocean, rivers, lakes and
forest. All of these natural resources have high potential for investment.

County Government

County Abbreviation: MY
Created: 1857
Capital: Harper
County Flag: The flag of Maryland County has three major colors, green, blue and yellow, with a palm tree and lighthouse inscribed in the field. The green color and the palm tree denote the county’s abundant natural vegetation; the yellow colour depicts the “sunshine”, the blue colour for the ‘valour’ of the County and the lighthouse as a guide for navigation. The County flag also has an insertion of the Liberian National Flag on the upper left-side.

Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 135,938
Districts: Maryland County is divided into seven main administrative Districts (Whojah, Gwelekpoken, Nyonken, Karluway # 1, Karluway # 2, Pleebo/Sodoken and Harper). A district commissioner heads each district. The County has two Statutory Districts – Barrobo and Karluway, each headed by a statutory district superintendent

Race/Ethnicity: The predominant ethnic group is Grebo, with Kru following closely.

Sex:
Age:

Health

Hospitals: The status of health services in the County has been gradually improving, but much still needs to be done to ensure access to quality health care for all the people of Maryland. According to the County Health Team (CHT), there were 23 health facilities
before the war, but presently there are only 17 supported including one referral hospital (JJ Dossen Hospital, supported by Merlin) and 16 clinics (7 supported by UNHCR through MERCI, 2 by Catholic Health Services, 1 by a private company, 4 by UNICEF through WVL and 2 by Merlin).
Clinics:
Doctors:

Economy

GDP:
Resources:

The County is known to contain sizeable deposits of gold, manganese and bauxite,
suggesting major prospects for the mining industry. Gold mining in the County is being carried out only on a small scale. Artisanal miners are in need of capacity building and formalization of their informal activities.
Unemployment: Rubber production is the County’s largest industry. Rubber from the County is produced by the Cavalla Rubber Plantation and 115 of small-size individual rubber farms. The Cavalla Rubber Plantation is the largest producer of rubber in Maryland County. The Plantation employs a total of 1,751 people out of which 1,045 are tappers, 54 are employed in the nursery program, and 700 are working in non tapping jobs.
Fishing is a common livelihood activity along the coast, employing an estimated 2,000 people.

County Budget:
Tourist Attraction: With the potential for tourism in Harper and the coastal areas such as Fish Town beach, focus should be directed to the developing resorts with the capacity to house 500 local and international tourists. Other intervention steps would be to establish heritage sites on the historical buildings and monuments and mark them as tourist sites.

Education

Elementary:

According to report from the County Education Office, there are 151
schools in total with 42 in Harper, 40 in Pleebo, 34 in Karluway and 35 in Barrobo. The schools have a total student population of 29,823, of which 16721 (56%) are boys and 13102 (44%) girls. There are 1071 teachers (74% male and 26% female). 40% of the teachers are volunteers, while 77% are not trained. 56 of the schools
have been rehabilitated, 55 have furniture, 32 have water and 61 have latrines.

High School:
Technical School:
College/University:

Geography

Land Area: 5,351 sq km (2,090 sq mi), representing roughly 6% of Liberia’s total area. Location: Maryland County is located in the Southeast most corner of Liberia and borders the Atlantic ocean to the South; the Cavalla River representing the international border with the Republic of Ivory Coast to the East; Grand Kru County on the West; and River Gee County to the Northwest.

 

Grand Cape Mount County

Grand Cape Mount County

County Vision: By 2027, we the People of Cape Mount County envisage a County with improved infrastructure and access to basic services including good health care, quality education, good road network, and
electricity; an industrialized agricultural economy; and a peaceful
and secure environment for all, where women are respected and fully empowered to contribute to growth and development. The People envision working together with commitment and dedication to develop their full economic, social and cultural potential, for a fuller and richer life for all, regardless of tribe, sex, religion or politics.

Overview: In 1461, Pedro De Sintra, a Portuguese Navigator on a mission to the West Coast of Africa, saw the beauty of the cape and mountains and named the area Cape du Mont, a Portuguese word meaning the Cape of the Mount, from which the name Grand Cape Mount County was derived.
In 1856, Cape Mount was carved out of Montserrado by a legislative act and became the fifth oldest County of the Republic of Liberia, known as Grand Cape Mount County. The name is derived from the beautiful green mountains above and the beautiful green vegetation below on the Atlantic Ocean. The natural beauty of the County headquarters of Robertsport is depicted by the existence of the Wakolor Mountain close to the shores of the Atlantic Ocean, which is watered by lagoons and Lake Piso and the mixed species of animals and plants that make the County one of the biodiversity hotspots and most attractive natural tourist area in Liberia. The Vai script, introduced by Bokeleh, serves as means through which many locals are able to communicate and keep financial transactions and other records.

County Government

County Abbreviation: CM
Created: 1844
Capital: Robertsport
County Flag: The County Flag shows a mountain against a white field in a rectangular shape, indicating peace and purity, with the Liberian flag on the top left corner. Religious harmony and intermarriage among the various ethnic groups has woven a rich social
fabric, which made this to be known as one of the most peaceful counties in Liberia until the Civil War.
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 127,076
Districts: Grand Cape Mount County is subdivided into four administrative districts, namely, Tewor, Garwular, Porkpa and Gola Konneh Districts, and the Commonwealth comprising of Tombey Chiefdom, Tallah Township and the capital city, Robertsport.
Robertsport is the seat of the County Administration and the home of the City Corporation.

Race/Ethnicity: The five major ethnic groups in the County are the Vai, Gola, Mende, Mandingo and Kissi. Other minority ethnic groups include Bassa, Gbandi, Kpelle, Grebo, Kru, Lorma, and Mano. The Vai vernacular is widely spoken, followed by the Gola, with percentage distributions of 60% and 23% respectively. Mende, Mandingo and Kissi languages are also spoken by sizeable minorities.

Sex:
Age:

Education

A total 124 functional educational facilities exist in Grand Cape Mount. Of this number, 107 are elementary schools, 14 are junior highs and three are senior high schools. Enrollment is
estimated 26,748 including 13,888 boys and 12,860 girls, with a
teacher population of 341, of which
311 are male and 30 are female.

Geography

Land Area:
Location: Grand Cape Mount is a border County found in the Western Region, specifically the south-western corner of Liberia along the coastal belt. Located on coordinates 7º
15! N, 11° 00’W, it is bounded in the Northeast by Gbarpolu County, in the East by Bomi and Lake Piso, in the South by the Atlantic Ocean and in the West by Sierra Leone, with a total land area of 5,827 square kilometers. The County is sparsely populated with concentrations in commercial, mining and fishing areas.

Economy

GDP: iron ore was one of Liberia’s economic mainstays, contributing as much as 64% of total exports or nearly 25% of the country’s GDP, and the country remained the second largest producer and exporter of iron ore before 1979.

Resources: The County is richly endowed with natural resources, mainly iron ore in Porkpa and Gola Konneh Districts, and diamonds and gold in Porkpa, Gola Konneh and Tewor District. It was reported during the CDA consultations that there may be valuable deposits of oil around Bobojah in Garwular District, though a geological survey has yet to confirm this claim. Cape Mount has fertile soils that favor the cultivation of a variety of cash crops including oil palm, rubber, cocoa and coffee, and food crops such as rice, cassava, yams and vegetables including pepper, bitter ball, okra, potato leaves, cabbage, and others.

Unemployment: According to the 2001 agricultural baseline survey, 78% of the rural households in Cape Mount are engaged in agricultural activities at subsistence scale. Formal employment accounts for as little as 4% of incomes, with the majority serving as casual workers at best. Most locals are instead engaged in petty trading. The main food crops produced in the County include rice, cassava and groundnut. Rubber is one of the country’s major cash crops and serves as a major revenue engine. County Budget:
Tourist Attraction: The Lake Piso region, with its fantastic biodiversity and idyllic vistas, makes it very attractive to tourists. In the 1970s, tourism thrived in the County, specially after construction of a 75-room hotel. There also exist a number of historical sites including the Tallah Township, which was a World War II Allied base. To promote tourism and
other commercial activities that will help to provide employment, revenue and economic growth, the CDA process heard calls for the declaration of the Lake Piso region as a multi-purpose protected area, construction of an air strip, rehabilitation of
Hotel Wakolor, construction of additional motels and restaurants in Robertsport, along Lake Piso, on York Island and in Sembehun, development of the beaches and construction of a public park.

Health

Hospitals: There are 33 functional health facilities which include one hospital, one health center, 30 clinics and one health post. The hospital (St. Timothy Government Hospital) and
three of the clinics (Fanti Town, Sembehun and Tallah) are found in the Commonwealth. Garwular District has functional clinics located in Jundu, Madina, Bomboja, Bendu, Kpeneji and Kanga, one health center in Sinje, one health post in Division 8, Guthrie (Private) and one non-functional clinic in Zarway Town. In Tewor District there are 11 facilities, in Tienni, Bo Waterside, Diah, Kulangor, Mambo,
Gondama, Gonelor, Jenewonde, Fahnja, Than Mafa and Bangorma. Five clinics are operational in Porkpa, in Bamballah, Bendaja, Kongo and Kawellahun, and four more in Gola Konneh District, namely Mbaloma, Lofa Bridge, Tahn and Varguay

Clinics:
Doctors:

Grand Gedeh County

Grand Gedeh County

Vision: Grand Gedeh: an icon of unity, peace, good governance and quality social, economic and infrastructure development for all.
Core Values: Equal access to opportunities for all Grand Gedeh Citizens; Assurance of peace, security and the rule of law;
Transparent and effective governance; Sustainable economic growth; and
Preservation of natural resources and environment.
Overview: Grand Gedeh is one of the few leeward counties created in the 1960s. It was established in 1964. Grand Gedeh was formerly known as the Eastern Province under the 1847 Constitution of Liberia. Its original capital was Tchien, now known as Zwedru. Grand Gedeh County, which was once known as part of the South Eastern Province under the 1847 Constitution of Liberia, finally gained its County status. Grand Gedeh is the third largest County in Liberia and historically, one of the most neglected. Inadequate and non-existent basic infrastructure continues to hobble the quality of life, and this was a main contributing factor to the civil crisis.
In 2005, the farming community in Grand Gedeh County cultivated the following food crops: rice (93% of farmers), cassava (35%), sweet potatoes/eddoes (3%), plantain/ banana (12%), corn (5%) and other vegetables (3%). Some 26% of farmers were growing cash crops in 2005. The most important cash crop grown in the County in 2005 was cocoa (72% of cash crop producers). This was
followed by plantain/banana (38%), coffee (13%) rubber (4%), palm nuts/oil (4%),
coconuts (2%) and pineapple (2%).

County Government

County Abbreviation: GG
Create: 1964
Capital: Zwedru
County Flag: The county’s flag has four colors: blue, white, green and orange.
The green represents the rich forest and highlands, while the white and blue depict peace and unity. The sun in the background painted orange represents the new era of development.

Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 125,258
Districts: Grand Gedeh County is subdivided into 2 Statutory districts, eight 8 Administrative districts, 16 Chiefdoms, 32 Clans, 3 Cities, and 236 Towns.

Race/Ethnicity: The Kranh-speaking people are in the vast majority, making up 96% of the County’s population. Other groups in the County include the Sapo (1%), the Bassa (1%) and the Kpelle (2%), though it is thought that all of Liberia’s 16 tribes are represented at least in small numbers.

Gender: Women and girls continue to have limited access to education, health services and judicial services, which has severely curtailed their participation in the formal economy. Women and girls have been missing out on opportunities and participation in management and decision-making on all levels of the society. This trend has contributed to feminization of poverty in the County, and in Liberia as a whole.

Age:

Economy

GDP:
Resources: Grand Gedeh is blessed with many natural resources, especially a large virgin forest that has not been touched for years by logging companies. The soil is rich and capable of producing any kind of food crops, and the streams and rivers are filled with various fish species. The County is also known to be rich in deposits of gold, iron ore and many others that have not been widely exploited. The County is noted for its rich iron ore reserves and vast forest, which are depicted in the flag of the County.

Unemployment:
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education

Elementary:
High School:
Technical School:
College/University:

Geography

Land Area: The total land area of Grand Gedeh County is 10,276
km”, which is about 9.22% of the total land area of Liberia.
Location: Grand Gedeh is located in southeastern Liberia, bounded on the Northwest through the North by Nimba, on the Northwest through the East by the Cavalla River forming
the boundary with Cote d’Ivoire, on the South by River Gee County, and on the Southwest by Sinoe County.

Health

Out of a total of 17 Basic Health Units in the County, only 11 are functional in the three districts. One hospital is operational, located in the Zwedru. MSF, Merlin and Caritas are the three NGOs running these health facilities. Three ambulances donated by UNHCR are used by Merlin.

Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

Nimba County

Nimba County

Vision: An Educated, United and Developed Nimba. An Educated Nimba All citizens of Nimba County will have access to education. A United Nimba. All citizens of Nimba County respect shared values of peace, equal opportunity and ethnic, cultural and religious freedoms. All citizens of Nimba County desire sustained economic growth, access to basic services and improved infrastructure.

Overview: Nimba attained County status during the presidential tenure of William V. S. Tubman by an act of the National legislature in 1964. The first Superintendent of the County was Hon. Gabriel G. Farngalo. Sanniquellie played host to the first Africa state summit involving Guinea, Ghana and Liberia on 25th May 1959, chaired by Liberia’s William V. S. Tubman. This summit eventually led to the founding of the Organization of African Unity (now known as the African Union or AU) in Addis Ababa, May 1963.

County Government
County Abbreviation: NI
Created: 1964
Capital: Sanniquellie
County Flag: The County is symbolized by a three-stripe orange, white and blue colored flag. The basic features include an elevation representing the mountains of the County and a green field indicating the rich vegetation.

Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population
Resident: 732,195. 98.27% of this population is made of locals, 0.31% (IDPs and refugees) returnees and 0.49% refugees.

 

Resident Population: 462,026
Districts: The County has sixteen
administrative districts, one county district, five statutory districts and seven electoral districts, each with newly-elected representatives to the Nation Legislature

 

Race/Ethnicity: The Manos and Gios are the two principal ethnic groups of Nimba
Sex:
Age:

Economy
GDP:
Unemployment:
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education
Elementary:
High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography
Land Area:
Location: Nimba County is situated in the Northeastern part of Liberia and shares borders with the Republic of Cote d’ Ivoire in the East, and the Republic of Guinea in the Northwest. Nimba is bordered by the counties of Bong, River Cess, Sinoe, and Nimba.

Health
Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

Bong County

Bong County

Vision: The people of Bong County, in partnership with the Government of Liberia, envisage rebuilding a County that is peaceful, secure, prosperous and inclusive, with economic opportunities for all.

Overview: Bong County derives its name from Mount Bong. Its political and administrative capital of Gbarnga City is located about 200 km NE of Monrovia. Bong County is one of the richest in Liberia, boasting natural resources such as gold, diamonds, iron ore and timber. The war brought the economic machinery in Bong to a grinding halt. As in the rest of Liberia, unemployment is a major challenge, especially amongst young women and men. Revitalization of the once-productive economy will occupy a place of prominence on the development agenda, helping to maintain the peace at both the county and national levels.

County Government
County Abbreviation: BG
Created: 1964
Capital: Gbarnga
County Flag: The flag of Bong County is orange and purple with a hammer in the background as a reference to the traditional importance of mining to the local economy.

 

Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population
Resident:
Resident Population: 333, 481
Districts:
Race/Ethnicity: Ethnic groups found in Bong County include all of Liberia’s 16 tribes. The Kpelle people represent the largest tribal block in the County, and members of many tribes speak the Kpelle language as a result.

 

Sex:
Age:

Economy
GDP:
Resources:

Bong County has three alluvial diamond and gold mining areas with sizeable deposits: Wainsue, Jorpulu Clan, Jorquelleh District (gold), Totota, Salala District (diamonds and gold), and Kokoyah, Kokoyah Statutory District (gold). While the extraction of iron ore ceased with the departure of the Bong Mining Company during the war, there are still thought to be huge deposits of iron ore along the Bong Mines Belt in Fuamah District.

 

Unemployment:
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education
Elementary:
High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography
Land Area:
Location: Bong County is situated roughly at the geographic center of Liberia. It is bordered by Lofa County on Northwest, Gbarpolu County on the West, Margibi County on the Southwest, Grand Bassa County on the South and South-East, and Nimba County on the East and the North-East. On the North, Bong County is bordered by the Republic of Guinea.

Health
Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

 

Lofa County

Lofa County

Vision: Lofa County shall be a united, secure center of excellence in the delivery of social and infrastructure services and poverty reduction for all. Core Values Equal access to opportunities for all Lofa citizens Restoration of peace, security and the rule of law Transparent and effective governance economic growth and job creation Preservation of natural resources and environmental protection

Overview: Lofa was created in 1964. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. Aenean commodo ligula eget dolor. Aenean massa. Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Donec quam felis, ultricies nec, pellentesque eu, pretium quis, sem. Nulla consequat massa quis enim. Donec pede justo, fringilla vel, aliquet nec, vulputate eget, arcu. In enim justo, rhoncus ut, imperdiet a, venenatis vitae, justo. Nullam dictum felis eu pede mollis pretium. Integer tincidunt. Cras dapibus. 

 

County Government

County Abbreviation: LO
Created: 1964
Capital: Voinjama
County Flag: Has green, light blue and brown. In the middle of the flag is a hand holding a stick across a river symbolizing unity. The river is the Lofa River, named after the county.
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent: George Dunor
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Economy

GDP:
Unemployment:
Resources: The County’s agricultural land is favorable to rice, cocoa, coffee, cassava, and sugar cane farming. The county also has mining products such as gold and diamond.
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Population

Resident: Lofian
Resident Population: 276,863
Districts: 7 Districts-Foya, Kolahum, Quardu Gbondi, Salayea, Vahun, Voinjama, and Zorzor
Race/Ethnicity: Lorma, Kissi, Gbande, Kpelle, Mende, and Mandingo
Sex: 143, 253 females and 133,611 males
Age:

Education

Elementary:
High School:
Technical School: 1
College/University: 2
Total Educational Institutions: 343

 

Health

Hospitals: 4
Healthcenters: 3
Clinics: 50
Doctors: 8, along with 300 medical personnel.

Geography

Land Area: 3,809.68 square miles
Location: Guinea is bounded at the North, Sierra Leone by the west, Bong and Gbarpolu Counties by the south

Bomi County

Bomi County

Vision: The people of Bomi envisage a County with good governance and rule of law, reconciliation, peace and stability, advancement in social, economic, political, cultural and human development, active participation of youth and women, rapid industrialization, provision of electricity, increased job opportunities and improvement of the standard of living of all citizens and residents.

Overview: Bomi means light in Gola. The region, aka Bomi Hills, or a former iron-mining district, was a territory of Montserrado County. In 1983, an Act of the Liberian Legislature upgraded the Bomi Territory to what is today referred to as Bomi County.  Liberia Mining Company (LMC) exploited iron ore in the County in the 1950s and 1960s. LMC closed operations in 1979. The county is also the location of the Sime Darby Rubber Plantation, the second largest in Liberia.
The county is focused on achieving five development goals: pavement of primary and secondary roads, security, economic revitalization, governance and the rule of law; and infrastructure and providing basic social services to the diverse county residents including the Gola, Dei, Mandingo, and Kpelle tribal people.

 

County Government

County Abbreviation: BM
Created: 1984
County Website:
Capital: Tubmanburg
County Flag: Shows a rich, fertile land crisscrossed with rolling hills, a tree in the background. The hills represent the rich iron ore, while the tree depicts the fertility of the soil.
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
Superintendent: Haja Washington
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident: Bomian
Resident Population: 84, 119
Districts: Largest District by population: Klay, Dowein, Seuhn, Mecca, and Senjeh
Race/Ethnicity: Gola, Dei, Mandingo and Kpelle.
Sex: 42,940 males and 41,179 females

Health

Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

 

Economy

GDP:
Unemployment: 70% of the population is engaged in agricultural activities, including the production or exploitation of rice, the stable food, cassava, sweet potatoes or eddoes, plantains, vegetables, rubber, palm oil, livestock, and fisheries. 20% is engaged in business and petty trading and 10% in local government activities.
Resources: Diamond, rubber, timber, iron ore, gold, water, stone, sand, fertile agriculture land
County Budget:
Bank:
Tourist Attraction:

Education

Elementary: 105
High School: C. H. Dewey High School, St. Dominic Catholic Mission, St. Paul Episcopal, Pentecostal, Charlotte Tolbert High, Parker High
Technical School: Suehn Industrial Academy Mission,
College/University : Bomi Community College
Teachers: 135

Geography

Land Area: 755 square miles
Location: Northern region. It borders Gbarpolu County in the north, Grand Cape Mount County in the west, Montserrado County in the South and the Atlantic Ocean on the East.

 

Grand Kru County

Grand Kru County

Vision: A unified, secured and prosperous County with equal opportunities and justice for all
Overview: The county is a land of vast forests irrigated by many rivers. Grand Kru has the potential for a much greater share of national economic activity, given its deposits of gold and timber reserves, but this potential is largely untapped. More than 70% of households are said to be food insecure or highly vulnerable to food insecurity. The County’s top-most priority for development can be summed up in one word: roads. Many needed services such as clinics, schools, and WATSAN are absent only because the Government and development partners cannot not reach the targeted populations. On April 12 1980, Decree number 87 was published by the Interim National Assembly, declaring Grand Kru County to be the area covering the eastern portion of Sinoe County, Sasstown Territory; the community between Maryland and then Grand Gedeh, Buah Statutory District; and the western half of Maryland County
along the Atlantic Ocean, Kru Coast Territory. Grand Kru County has great
potential for livestock breeding and poultry, as there are large savanna grasslands in the County. The County was historically known for the breeding of the livestock, especially cows, goats and sheep. Grand Kru County is also endowed with fertile land that supports agricultural activities, particularly the cultivation of sugarcane, groundnut, oil palm, pineapple, and cocoa.

County Government

County Abbreviation: GK
Created: 1984
Capital: Barclayville
County Flag: The County emblem, the flag, has three colors: green, yellow and white. The flag has ten vertical stripes; four green, four yellow and two white, with a palm tree in the center. In the upper left-hand corner is the Liberian flag. The green represents the evergreen rain forest, the green vegetation and the savanna that represents the potential for huge private sector investment in the areas of logging and cattle breeding. The yellow depicts the long belt of gold deposits in the County, while the white represents purity.

Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 57,913
Districts:
Race/Ethnicity: Kru and Grebo
Gender:

Despite the progress since the end of
the war, gender continues to play a
decisive role in determining access to
resources and services. Women and
girls continue to have limited access
to education, health services and
judicial services, which has severely
curtailed their participation in the
formal economy. Women and girls have been missing out on opportunities and
participation in management and decision-making on all levels of the society. This trend has contributed to feminization of poverty in the County, and in Liberia as a whole.

Age:

Health

Hospitals: 12
Clinics:
Doctors:

Economy

GDP:
Resources: Tree crops in production in Grand Kru include oil palm, cocoa, rubber, sugarcane, and coffee, but plantations lie in ruin and need rehabilitation. Sugarcane and rubber production are currently on the increase because of their industrial nature, especially rubber. Rubber is a part of the commercial life-blood of the County, as an estimated 6% of households were involved in tapping in 2005, even as the industry languishes from lack of investment. Sugarcane is used to produce cane juice, a local beverage that is widely consumed. Decoris Oil Palm Plantation covers parts of Eastern Half of Grand Kru County.

Employment: 80-85% of the County’s
population, as only about 13% of the people have formal jobs
Unemployment: Unemployment is a serious problem across the entire country and Grand Kru is no
exception. There are no formal employments in the County apart from those who work for the GoL. Unlike other counties, Grand Kru has got large plantations (i.e. rubber and oil palm). Commercial activities are almost non-existent apart from gold
mining. Petty trading, casual laboring and small-scale farm to market agriculture activities constitute the economic life-blood of the County.

County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education

140 functional schools
Elementary:
High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography

Land Area: Grand Kru County has a total land area of 891 square miles or 2298.78 square kilometers.
Location: Grand Kru County is located along the southern Atlantic Coast of Liberia. The Western boundary is with Sinoe County. To the North is River Gee County and the Eastern boundary is with Maryland County.

Marghibi County

Marghibi County

Vision: The People of Margibi envision a peaceful and secure County
with modern Cities and paved highways connecting Districts
and Townships, with equality of access to health care, education, and justice for all, including women and vulnerable groups, regardless of tribe, religion, or politics.
Overview: Margibi County is famous for its numerous rubber plantations, paramount among them being the Firestone and Salala plantations. These institutions have been instrumental in providing jobs and other basic services including schools, shelter, and health care for thousands of inhabitants of the County. The County can boast of some excellent educational institutions, including the famous Booker T. Washington Institute (BWI) in Kakata, and the Kakata Rural Teacher Training Institute (KRTTI). About 90% of the County’s population are Christians, 5% are Muslims and another 5% is Animist. The main livelihood activities are subsistence agriculture, rubber tapping and charcoal production.
Margibi County is located in central Liberia just about 45 minutes’ drive from
Monrovia. It is one of the newest counties, created just prior to the civil war. It was founded in 1984 as the 13th county, when two territories, Marshall and Gibi, were removed from Montserrado County and merged to form Margibi. The name derives from “Mar” for Marshall Territory and “Gibi” from Gibi District.

County Government
County Abbreviation: MG
Created: 1985
Capital: Kakata
County Flag: The County’s flag is comprised of two major colors, green and red. The green color represents the forest region of the County and its abundant natural vegetation. The
red represents the county’s share of the struggle that brought in the military and subsequently transformed the country from Military to Civilian rule.

 

Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population
Resident:
Resident Population: 209,923
Districts: The County is comprised of two main administrative districts, Gibi in the upper part and Mambah-Kaba in the Lower part, both of them headed by District Commissioners. The other subdivisions are the six townships (Cinta, Borlola and
Larkeyta in Upper Margibi, and Charleville, Schefflin and Lloydville in Lower Margibi), also headed by Commissioners, and two cities (Kakata and Marshall) administered by city mayors.

Race/Ethnicity: The Bassa is the dominant ethnic group, though all or nearly all of Liberia’s tribes are
represented in the County. About 90% of the County’s population is Christians, with roughly 5% Muslims and 5% Animists.

 

Sex:
Age:

Health
Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

Economy
GDP: With 50% of the country’s GDP coming from agriculture, achieving
this objective will require a similar rate of growth in agriculture

Resources: Liberia’s economy has traditionally been based on subsistence agriculture, rubber,
mining (mainly of iron ore, but also of gold and diamonds) and timber. Commercial or cash crops produced in the county included rubber, produced by 52% of households; cacao, produced by 10% of households; coconuts, produced by 14% of households; sugarcane and pineapple, each produced by 14%; plantain/
banana, produced by 34%; palm nuts, produced by 14%; and cola nuts, produced by 3%.”One percent of households surveyed owned goats, another 6% owned pigs, 6% owned ducks and 39% owned chickens.

Employment:

Unemployment:
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education
Elementary:
High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography
Land Area: The total land area of the County is approximately 2866.67 square miles, with an estimated 118,000 acres.
Location: The county is ideally situated along the Atlantic
Ocean in the South and neighbors Montserrado County on the East, Bong County on the North and Northeast, and Grand Bassa County on the West.

Rivercess County

Rivercess County

Vision: River Cess County shall be a united, secure, center of excellence in the delivery of social and infrastructure services in poverty reduction for all. Core values: Equal access to opportunities for all River Cess citizens Restoration of peace, security and the rule of law Transparent and effective governance Sustainable economic growth and job creation Preservation of natural resources and environmental protection.
Overview:

River Cess was the twelfth county established in Liberia. The County derives its name from the Cestos (meaning “crawfish basket”) River. Cestos City, formerly known as River Cess City, is the headquarters of the County. The main livelihood activities today include palm oil production, hunting, food crops production and fishing. Acute and chronic malnutrition rates are alarmingly high. This in part could be explained by the geographical isolation of River Cess. Most households’ access to improved drinking water and health facilities is extremely limited.

The area underwent various political and territorial metamorphoses before becoming a County, starting in 1887 when the area was declared a district under Grand Bassa County. River Cess District extended from the Newcess River in the West to the Sankun River in the East. The first capital was Timbo City. In 1912, River Cess District was accorded the status of Statutory District and subsequently, assumed the status of Territory in 1955 with its headquarters relocated at River Cess City (now Cestos City).

 

County Government

County Abbreviation: RI
Created: 1985
Capital: Rivercess
County Flag:
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent: B. Rancy Ziankahn
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 71,509
Districts: River Cess County has eight administrative districts: Dodain, Joe River, Fehn, Zarflahn, Nyunwein, Central River Cess, BearWor, and Sangbalor.
Race/Ethnicity: The Bassa-speaking people are in the majority, making up 96 % of the County’s population. Other ethnic groups in the County include the Kpelle (1%), the Kru (2%) and the Grebo (1%). Indigenous tribes make 99% of the population, dominated by Bassa (78%) and Kru (18%) tribes. Kru population is founding the districts of Yarnee and Timbo, mostly
involved in fishing activities. The Mandingo tribe is also represented by a small minority population near Cestos. Many Mandingos have adopted the Bassa culture, yet continue to speak their own language. Representations of Kissi, Gio and Krahn are also visible in the area but in a small minority.

Gender:

Women and girls continue to have limited access to education, health services and judicial services, which has severely curtailed their participation in the formal economy. Women and girls have been missing out on opportunities and participation in management and decision-making on all levels of the society. This trend has contributed to feminization of poverty in the County, and in Liberia as a whole.

Age:

Health

Hospitals: The entire County is served by only ten health care facilities (NRC Needs Assessment Survey, January 2007). Five of these facilities are located in Morweh District (Blowhen
Sayon, Gbeh Wodobli, Ziadue, Zammie and Zeegar Town), and the remaining five can be found in Timbo Statutory District (Bargbeh Town, Cestos City, Guewein, Neezuin
and Sawkon). The County does not have an assigned doctor, and most health workers are untrained or poorly-trained volunteers.

Clinics:
Doctors:

Economy

GDP:

Resources: The main crops cultivated
during this time and their corresponding percentages are as follows: Rice (84%), Cassava (77%), and assorted vegetables (6%). The main crops produced for household consumption included rice, cassava, plantain/banana, vegetables, sweet
potatoes and corn. Cash crops included rubber (31%), coffee (4%), cacao (19%), coconuts (16%), sugarcane (7%), pineapple (13%), plantain/banana (50%), palm nuts/
oil (12%) and cola nuts (2%). One out of every four to five households in 2005 had a small section of land (0.5 – 1.0 acres) upon which cocoa or coffee trees were grown to provide cash income. Rice is grown mostly under rainfed conditions.

River Cess County has four principal rivers (Timbo, Cestos, Po and Sahnkuen) along with many smaller rivers that flow into the Atlantic Ocean, which provide breeding
grounds for the wide range of fish resources including large pelagic, small pelagic and demersal fish, shrimp and lobster. These varieties can be exploited for domestic,
regional, and international trade.

Employment: 90% of the households cultivate rice, and 70% grow cassava. Other crops include maize, yams, okra, sugarcane, and peanuts.
Rubber, cocoa, coffee, and palm oil

Unemployment:
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education

Elementary:
High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography

Land Area: River Cess has an area of 5,263.4 square kilometers and a coastline of 62 kilometers.
Location: The area is bound by the counties of Grand Bassa in the west, Nimba and Grand Gedeh in the
North, Sinoe in the Southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean in the South.

River Gee County

River Gee County

 

Vision: River Gee: a unified, peaceful and well-governed County with
robust socio-economic and infrastructure development for all.
Core Values: Building on our core competencies and values, we have a mission to support. Equal access to opportunities for all River Gee Citizens; Assurance of peace, security and the rule of law; Transparent and effective governance;
Sustainable economic growth; and Preservation of natural resources and environment.
Overview: River Gee is one of the newest counties in Liberia. It was carved out of Grand Gedeh County, which was formerly part of the Eastern Province prior to 1964. The County was established in 2000 and has its political seat in Fish Town. Establishment of the County was predicated upon growing tensions between the Grebo and Krahn ethnic groups over the years, particularly during the 1980s and 1990s, characterized by military and phantom democratic regime of Samuel Doe, and the early war years of Charles Taylor. The County is rich in natural resources including gold, timber and rivers. It is the host of the Grebo National Forest, located in the Gloarro belt. River Gee County is predominantly peopled by the
Grebo ethnic group, with smaller numbers of Liberia’s other ethnic groups. River Gee has three large settlements: Fish Town, which is famous for its catfish water,
Kanweaken, which is a commercial Town, and Webbo, noted for missionary activities.

County Government

County Abbreviation: RG
Created: 2000
Capital: Fish Town
County Flag:
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent:
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 66,789
Districts: There are five districts. They are Gbeapo, Webbo, Potupo, Tienpo, and Chedpo.
Race/Ethnicity: River Gee County is predominantly peopled by the
Grebo ethnic group, with smaller numbers of Liberia’s other ethnic groups. River Gee has three large settlements: Fish Town, which is famous for its catfish water,
Kanweaken, which is a commercial Town, and Webbo, noted for missionary activities.

Gender: The County is strongly committed to gender equity as a means to maintain peace, reduce poverty, enhance justice and promote development. Despite the progress
since the end of the war, gender continues to play a decisive role in determining access to resources and services. Women and girls continue to have limited access to education, health services and judicial services, which has severely curtailed their
participation in the formal economy. Women and girls have been missing out on opportunities and participation in management and decision-making on all levels of
the society. This trend has contributed to feminization of poverty in the County, and in Liberia as a whole.

Age:

Health

Hospitals: There are three
Health Centers and 11 public clinics in the County. These facilities have not received routine assistance from INGOs or UN agencies. Recently, Medical Emergency Relief Corporative International (MERCI), targeted six of them. The County has no referral hospital. Two small private clinics are also operating in Jarkaken, Chedepo District, supported by Catholic Health Service (CHS); and in Japroken, Potupo District, supported by the Lutheran Church. The American NGO Christian humanitarian Assistance Programme (CHAP) plans also to offer some support to the clinic in Tiempo Statutory District. There is no secondary health care. There is not a single doctor in the County and there is an evident need of trained and qualified health personnel, since the majority of the health workers are volunteers.

Moreover, despite their dedication, the salaries of contracted health workers are not paid regularly. All
health clinics are reported to be lacking hospital equipment and medicines. Additionally, people who live outside the main Towns have to walk for hours in order to reach a clinic or Health Center.

Clinics:
Doctors:

Economy

GDP:
Resources:

River Gee also contains a wide variety of natural resources which are not
being exploited at a rate anywhere near their potential. Investment in agriculture, forestry, rubber, timber and mining will drastically alter the living condition of River Gee
citizens, by creating jobs and attracting both foreign and local capital, which will stimulate the local economy. The County’s major growth areas are below discussed in terms of two major categories, namely agriculture and natural Resources. Unemployment: Unemployment is a serious problem across the entire country and River Gee is no exception. There are few formal wage jobs in the County. Petty trading, casual laboring and small-scale agriculture constitute the economic life-blood of the County.

County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education

Elementary: The education sector in the County, like in other parts of Liberia, faces numerous
difficulties, from inadequate facilities to inadequate personnel and material in terms of quantity and quality. The result is that there is a general lack of modern school buildings, furniture, and materials, making for an inadequate learning atmosphere.
Additionally, a large number of untrained teachers, most of whom are volunteers, continue to pose major challenges to the quality and standard of the school system.
The County hosts the only training institute for primary school teachers in the entire southeastern region, the Webbo Rural Teacher Training Institute (WRTTI). Located in
Konowroken, Webbo Statutory District, the premises remain in good condition although damaged during the war. Plans to rehabilitate WRTTI are currently under consideration.

High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography

Land Area: River Gee has a total land area of 5,627 square kilometers.
Location: River Gee is situated in southeastern Liberia. It is bounded on the North by Grand Gedeh County, on the East by Ivory Coast, on the West by Sinoe County, and on the South by Maryland County.

Gbarpolu County

Gbarpolu County

Vision: We envision a Gbarpolu County that is secure, unified, and effectively governed, for the sake of sustained socio-economic development. Mission: Our mission is to ensure maximum and effective utilization and management of the resource potential of Gbarpolu County, for the betterment of its people.

Overview: Created in 2003 from territory previously known as Lower Lofa County, Gbarpolu is the newest of Liberia’s fifteen political subdivisions. The County is famous as the home and final resting place of King Sao Boso of the Kingdom of Suehn-Bopolu. He resolved the conflict between the settlers of the Mississippi Colonization Society and the natives and paved the way for their co-existence in the coastal areas. Bopolu also served as a stop along the route for the trans-Sahara trade. In spite of an illustrious history that far predates the arrival of the settlers from America, over the decades Bopolu and its environs slowly became an isolated and impoverished place, Although the main source of livelihood in Gbarpolu is subsistence agriculture, Gbarpolu also has an abundance of exploitable timber and mineral resources, including gold, diamonds, are the most commonly exploited mineral resources in the County. Unregulated artisanal gold wells are present in Henry’s Town, Weasua and Belekpalamu in Bopolu, Gbarma and Gou-Nwolala Districts, among others.

County Government

County Abbreviation: GP
Created: 2001
Capital: Popolu
County Flag: The County’s flag consists of a gold background on which a centrally placed diamond
is flanked on the right by a tree symbolizes the richness of its resources. Given these resources, Gbarpolu County is well placed to recover strongly from the long national crisis.
Emblem:
Motto:
Song:
State Website:
Superintendent: Allen Gbowee
Legislators:
Senators:
Local Government:

Population

Resident:
Resident Population: 83,388
Districts: Belleh District (17,288), Bokomu (10,460), Bopolu (18,298), Gbarma (15,972), Gounwolaila (8,115), and Kongba (13,625)
Race/Ethnicity:
Sex:
Age:

Health

Hospitals:
Clinics:
Doctors:

Economy

GDP:
Resources: Agriculture, especially rice farming, is the chief occupation of locals in Gbarpolu. Households grow vegetables, eddoes, bananas, plantains, sweet potatoes and
cassava as food crops. Rubber, oil palm, coffee, cocoa, and plantain/banana constitute the major cash crops of the County (see Figure below). Palm nuts are processed into the staple palm oil for sale and domestic consumption. Two other important sources of income are hunting and fishing. About 63% of households were engaged in inland fishing in rivers.

There are various mineral resources in Gbarpolu County; gold and diamonds are the most commonly exploited. Gold deposits are found in Henry’s Town, Weasua, and Belekpalamu, while diamond deposits are found in Tarkpoima, Sirleaf Town, Smith Camp, and other sites. Iron ore has been discovered, and unconfirmed reports point to the existence of potentially valuable lead, manganese, silver, fluorite, graphite and copper deposits.

Unemployment:
County Budget:
Tourist Attraction:

Education

Elementary:

The Bopolu Central high school in Bopolu and Zuo Mission high school in Gbarma are the only senior high schools in the County. There are junior high schools in Gbarma and Belle Districts, and twenty-four elementary schools in Bopolu, nineteen in Gbarma, fourteen in Kongba, seventeen in Belle, sixteen in Bokomu and ten in Gou-Nwolala.

High School:
Technical School:
College/University :

Geography

Land Area: 9,689 km2 (3,741 sq mi).
Location: The county is located in the western region of Liberia. The County has borders with Lofa to the North, Bong to the East, Bomi to the South, and Grand Cape Mount County and Sierra Leone to the West.

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